WK Webster
THE MARINE & TRANSIT
CLAIMS SPECIALISTS
Los Angeles New York London Singapore
WK Webster

CARGO CLAIMS

Adjusting, Settling, Third Party Administration

WK Webster

RECOVERIES

No Cure - no pay, World Wide Recoveries

WK Webster

CARGO CASUALTY

Protecting Cargo in Terminated or Interrupted Voyages

WK Webster

HULL CLAIMS

Global 24/7, Casualty Response & Investigation

WK Webster

TRANSIT LIABILITY

Freight Forwarding, Haulage, Logistics, Risk Prevention

WK Webster

SHIP LIABILITY

P&I, F&D, Charterer's Liability

WK Webster

CARGO SURVEYS

Survey, Risk Assessment, Loss Prevention

WK Webster

H & M SURVEYS

Consulting Marine Engineers & Expert Witness

Cargo Casualty : Salvage

Following a casualty, the crew may need external assistance to save the ship and cargo from the dangers faced. This assistance may be provided by a third party volunteer, a Salvor, whose intervention may save the ship and cargo.

Example: A ship has run aground and is holed. Salvors intervene and successfully refloat the vessel. They effect emergency repairs to prevent ingress of water that could lead to the vessel sinking. On what basis are they paid for their services?

To be entitled to remuneration for the services provided, Salvors must be successful in their endeavors. The International Convention on Salvage 1989 sets out the criteria to be taken into account in determining the remuneration that Salvors will receive. These include the complexity of the services, the dangers faced and the value of the property salved.

The ship and cargo saved contribute to the reward payable to the Salvors. Each Party contributes to the total award pro rata to the value of the property saved. But how is the remuneration determined?

Salvage claims may be settled either through negotiation or by Arbitration/Court proceedings. Salvage services are most frequently rendered on the basis of a LLOYD'S OPEN FORM (LOF) salvage contract which provides for the Salvor's claim to be determined by Arbitration in London.

At the time the services are performed, the amount the Salvors will receive for their work cannot be assessed readily. Salvors will seek security which, once the level of their reward is determined, they can call upon to ensure that they receive payment. Most salvage claims are assessed through Arbitration.

The INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION ON SALVAGE 1989 provides:
Salvage operation means any act or activity undertaken to assist a vessel or any other property in danger in navigable waters or in any other waters whatsoever.

HOW CAN WE HELP?

  • Initial Casualty Advice
  • Casualty Investigation
  • Advice on Security Requirements
  • Appointment of Experts
  • Calculation of Salved Values
  • Review of Evidence
  • Settlement Negotiations
  • Representation at Arbitration
  • Review award and Recommend Action